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Do you guys have any tips for improving your aim?


DarkyNeko
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As scout try to mirror your enemy's movements, this goes even more if you are fighting another scout, but not if you are fighting a splash damage class or a heavy. For shot guns on other classes it's just about tracking targets and that comes with practice.

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From what I've learned and have been told by better scouts/ Scout mains in the past is, try to aim with the mouse as little as possible.  Use your speed to aim, adjusting it with the mouse. It also helps to be a bit more unpredictable in when and where you go to crouch jump as an enemy projectile barrels straight for your crotch. A single unpredicted crouch jump can mean the difference between a 5-killstreak [life] and being dominated [death].

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Slow down your Mouse Sensitivity.

If you want an example: My Setup is 1.0 In the TF2 Options and my Mouse has 1600 dpi (For any other class than Sniper) or 800dpi (Only when i play Sniper tbh)

It will be really uncomfortable to play with that at the beginning. But once you get used to it you noticeably hit more shots than usual.

Edited by [FoG] Korato
typo
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  • 4 months later...

I found a consistent way to hit 98% of my shotgun shots. I do not hold my crosshair on the enemy. Instead i keep it a little bit at the floor and then flick towards him and click while my mouse is going over them. This is probably because i play alot of rhythm games and am used to pressing keys with timing like that. I got called out for cheating alot while doing this.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Being a competitive player with over 4000 hours, I've experimented with many aiming styles and sensitivities.

 

Ultimately, what I've discovered is that the trick to aiming well is to aim relative to the mannerisms and movements which feel good/natural for you, and work well. A large part of this is adjusting your sensitivity to find something comfortable. 

Sensitivity is only part preference. For example, don't use an incredibly high sensitivity on scout if it's something you can't control; it simply won't work- and this is coming from a person who's used a sensitivity ranging from approximately 10 cm to nearly 50 cm.

However, if say, a high sensitivity works well for you on scout, don't change it. If you're playing consistently and feel comfortable and confident with it, there's no need to change it. Just practice, and adjust as needed. Try not to change it much when you're settling on one sensitivity, though. In short, use a sensitivity that works for you within a reasonable range. 

 

Once you've got your sensitivity worked out, the rest comes down to continuous practice and experimentation. Your aiming style naturally develops as you train your muscle memory and movement, however, if you're newer to the game then you'll probably be inconsistent and won't be as confident in your aim. This can be combatted by letting your strafing and overall movement take care of the bain brunt of your aim while your mouse acts as a tool for slight adjustment for added precision. There are faults with this method, however. Your movement will be rather predictable and your aim will be fairly slow and basic. It's time that will slowly force the subtle adjustment of your mouse to have a more prominent role in aiming. Once you've spent a good amount of time with tf2, your aim will naturally progress into a muscle memory-based method involving lots of micro-adjusting and flicks rather than a method relying on your movement to line up shots.

 

Whether or not your movement will play a big part in your aim is ultimately up to you and how you play the game. Aiming will always require a certain amount of help from your movement to help keep a good rhythm and consistency, and in my views from trial and error, you should always allow the precision involved in aiming to be done with your mouse while your general crosshair should be placed near the enemy with the aid of your strafe keys. Too much strafing and your aim becomes linear and predictable, but too little leaves way too much room for your mouse to move and quickly lock onto targets. This allows your movement to be highly complex as it is independent of your aim, but with the added con of being incredibly hard to aim consistently, especially when your muscle memory's not developed to a great extent. Your aiming style will vary in terms of how much your mouse movement and strafing is involved in landing shots, which is a perfectly normal thing. There is no 'best' way to aim with scout or any hitscan class (excluding sniper to a certain amount). There have been a great number of different aiming styles that are movement and mouse prominent- none is necessarily better than the other. What defines a good aiming style is whether it inhibits the movement or not, its consistency and its practical use to landing a vast amount of different types of shots.

 

(Here is an example of a scout using a heavily movement-based aiming style: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqDOUA8tiYE

And here's an example of a scout using a, not heavily aim-based aiming style, but a style that incorporates a good amount of mouse movement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=um3Isf2KWCM)

 

 

 

One final word of advice: don't use a different sensitivity for a different class. A very common setup for players to use is a higher sensitivity for projectile classes and a lower one for hitscan. This is a bad idea. It messes with your muscle memory and can leave you inconsistent as you switch between classes. I've tried this for nearly a year and while my aim was decent, it simply wasn't that sharp. A select few have been able to pull off this method with great success- stark comes to mind, using 16 cm for projectiles and 50 for hitscan. However, obvious inconsistency can be seen in his gameplay when he switches the two without prior warmup. In the end it's not impossible, however it's not recommended.

 

Good luck, but most importantly, enjoy yourself.

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